How to Import and Export Browser Bookmarks

I like to use multiple browsers and always mess around with any new browser in town. And so, quite often I import/export my bookmarks around. If you are looking to move your browser bookmarks to a different browser, then I can help.

In this post, I’ll show you how to import and export bookmarks and other data in:

Chrome

Import bookmarks

  1. Click on the three vertical dots menu at the top-right corner and go to Bookmarks > Import bookmarks and settings.
    bookmarks and settings
  2. Next, either select the an installed browser to directly import the bookmarks, or select the HTML file from your PC. While directly importing, you can select type of data as well, such as browser history, bookmarks, passwords, and search engines. Click on Import when you are done to import the data.
    chrome

Export bookmarks

  1. Click on the three vertical dots menu again and go to Bookmarks > Bookmark manager.
    chrome bookmark manager
  2. Go to Organize > Export bookmarks to HTML file. An HTML file will be ready to download.
    export chrome bookmark

Firefox

Import bookmarks

  1. From the top bar, click on the Show Bookmarks button, and select Show all bookmarks. You may also use Ctrl + Shift + B for this.
    show all firefox bookmarks
  2. Next, click on the Import and Backup menu at the top and click on Import Bookmarks from HTML to import them from an HTML file, or click on Import Data from Another Browser to select another browser to directly import data.
    import bookmarks firefox

Export bookmarks

From the same Import and Backup menu, click on the Export Bookmarks to HTML option and save the HTML.

export firefox bookmarks

Opera

Import bookmarks

  1. Open Opera menu from the top-left corner and click on Settings. Alternatively, you can use the shortcut Alt + P.
  2. Here move to the Browser section from the left menu and click on the Import bookmarks and settings button under the Default browser heading.
    opera bookmarks and settings
  3. Now you can either select a supported browser from the drop-down list or select “Bookmarks HTML file” option to import from an HTML file.
    import opera bookmarks

Export bookmarks

Unfortunately, Opera doesn’t support export feature. However, you can use Bookmarks Import & Export Opera extension to get this functionality. Install and open up the extension, and click on the Export button to download the bookmarks HTML file.

export opera bookmarks

Microsoft Edge

Import bookmarks

  1. Click on the three horizontal dots menu at the top-right corner and select Settings.
  2. Now click on the Import from another browser button under the Import favorites and other info” button.
  3. Next, you can select a supported browser, or click on the Import from file button to import from an HTML file.
    import edge bookmarks

Export bookmarks

Go to the “Import your info” menu again and click on the “Export to file” button to download the HTML file.

export favourites

Note: The export is only available in the Creators Update of Windows 10. In case you haven’t updated Windows 10 to Creators Update, you can use this third-party tool Edge Manage to export favorites.

Internet Explorer

Import bookmarks

  1. Click on the Star icon at the top-right corner, and click on the tiny upside down arrow next to the Add to favorites button. Here click on the Import and export option.
    import and export internet explorer
  2. A wizard will open up. Here you can either select Import from another browser or Import from a file option and then follow the wizard to import data.
    import bookmarks internet explorer

Export bookmarks

  1. Open the same “Import and export” wizard and select the “Export to a file” option.
    export internet explorer bookmarks
  2. On the next page, you can select the type of data that you want to export, including Favorites, Feeds, and Cookies. Afterward, click Next to finish the process and download the HTML file.
    select data internet explorer

Vivaldi

Import bookmarks

  1. Click on the Vivaldi menu button at the top-left corner and select Import Bookmarks and Settings from the File option.
    import vivaldi bookmark settings
  2. From the drop-down menu, you can select a supported browser or an HTML file. Interestingly, Vivaldi also supports importing data from Opera, although Opera natively doesn’t support the export feature.
    import vivaldi bookmark

Export bookmarks

To export bookmarks, go to the File menu again and select “Export Bookmarks” to download the HTML file.

export vivaldi bookmarks

Wrap up

While importing data, try to automatically import from an installed browser instead of an HTML file. This way you’ll be able to import more data, including cookies, bookmarks, history and saved passwords.

The exported HTML file usually only contains bookmarks, so direct importing is better and more convenient.

How to Always Open Your Browser in Private Mode

Your browser’s private mode leaves no traces of your browsing on your PC, which is very useful if your PC is in use of other people as well. If you like keeping your browsing private all the time, then you might be interested in launching your browser in private mode by default.

In this post, I’ll show you how you can make Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Opera open in a Private mode when you launch the browser.

Note: Private mode can only remove your tracks on your PC, your activity can still be tracked from your network or by using a spying tool.

Google Chrome

You can modify one of the Chrome shortcuts to always open in incognito mode by adding a command to it. You can choose any shortcut for this purpose, including the desktop shortcut, Start Menu, or even on the Taskbar.

  1. Right-click on your desired shortcut and select “Properties” from the context menu.
  2. Here under the “Shortcut” tab, add -incognito at the end of the “Target” string. For instance, ...chrome.exe" -incognito. Do note that there is a space between the ending quotes and the dash.
google chrome properties

Now click on “OK” and the shortcut will be modified.

Whenever you will access Chrome from this shortcut, it will open up in incognito mode (private mode).

Mozilla Firefox

There are two ways you can force Firefox to always open in private mode. You can either modify its shortcut or enable this feature from Firefox options.

Method 1: Enabling it inside Firefox
  1. In Firefox, click on the hamburger menu at the top-right corner and select “Options“.
  2. Here move to the “Privacy” and check the checkbox next to “Always use private browsing mode” under the “History” section.
firefox privacy

You will have to restart Firefox for these settings to take place.

Now whenever you will open Firefox from any shortcut, it will open up in Private mode. Although the Firefox Private mode icon will not appear at the top of the browser but don’t worry you are still browsing in private mode.

Method 2: Modifying Firefox shortcut
  1. Right-click on any of the Firefox shortcuts and select Properties from the menu.
  2. Now add -private at the end of the Target string. Make sure you add a space between the quotes and the dash, like this "....firefox.exe" -private.
mozilla firefox properties

Click on the OK button to confirm the change, and when you will open Firefox using this shortcut it will open in Private mode.

You will see the usual Private mode page along with the Private mode icon at the top of the browser.

Opera

To open private browsing mode in Opera, you can do the following steps:

  1. Right-click on any of the Opera shortcuts and click on Properties from the context menu.
  2. Similar to Firefox, you need to add -private at the end of the Target string with a space between the quotes and the dash.
opera properties

Finally, click on the OK button to apply the changes. Launch Opera using this shortcut and it will launch in Private mode.

Internet Explorer

Similar to other browsers in this list, you will also have to modify the Target box to make Internet Explorer open in Private mode by default.

However, in Windows 10 you will have to edit Internet Explorer’s original shortcut inside Windows Accessories, this will not work for custom made shortcuts.

To access the original shortcut, type Internet Explorer in the search bar and right-click on it. From the menu, select Open file location.

IE open file location

Windows Explorer will open up and you should be able to see Internet Explorer shortcut here. Right-click on it and then click on Properties from the context menu. Now add -private at the end of the Target string and click on OK to confirm it.

Now you can access Internet Explorer from any shortcut and it will always open in private mode.

internet explorer properties

Safari & Microsoft Edge

It seems both Safari and Microsoft Edge don’t allow you to change the default launch settings. For Microsoft Edge, I have tried modifying its shortcut from different areas.

Either the Target box was uneditable, or nothing happens after making the edits. For now, you’ll have to manually launch the private window when you will open the browser.

Wrap up

I will recommend you to create a separate shortcut for launching your favorite browser in private mode. As private mode also delete cookies and other useful information about the sites you visit, you may like to browse some website in normal mode for the ease of access.

Additionally, if you ever need to stop your browser from opening in private mode, simply revert the changes you have made.

How to Always Open Your Browser in Private Mode

Your browser’s private mode leaves no traces of your browsing on your PC, which is very useful if your PC is in use of other people as well. If you like keeping your browsing private all the time, then you might be interested in launching your browser in private mode by default.

In this post, I’ll show you how you can make Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Opera open in a Private mode when you launch the browser.

Note: Private mode can only remove your tracks on your PC, your activity can still be tracked from your network or by using a spying tool.

Google Chrome

You can modify one of the Chrome shortcuts to always open in incognito mode by adding a command to it. You can choose any shortcut for this purpose, including the desktop shortcut, Start Menu, or even on the Taskbar.

  1. Right-click on your desired shortcut and select “Properties” from the context menu.
  2. Here under the “Shortcut” tab, add -incognito at the end of the “Target” string. For instance, ...chrome.exe" -incognito. Do note that there is a space between the ending quotes and the dash.
google chrome properties

Now click on “OK” and the shortcut will be modified.

Whenever you will access Chrome from this shortcut, it will open up in incognito mode (private mode).

Mozilla Firefox

There are two ways you can force Firefox to always open in private mode. You can either modify its shortcut or enable this feature from Firefox options.

Method 1: Enabling it inside Firefox
  1. In Firefox, click on the hamburger menu at the top-right corner and select “Options“.
  2. Here move to the “Privacy” and check the checkbox next to “Always use private browsing mode” under the “History” section.
firefox privacy

You will have to restart Firefox for these settings to take place.

Now whenever you will open Firefox from any shortcut, it will open up in Private mode. Although the Firefox Private mode icon will not appear at the top of the browser but don’t worry you are still browsing in private mode.

Method 2: Modifying Firefox shortcut
  1. Right-click on any of the Firefox shortcuts and select Properties from the menu.
  2. Now add -private at the end of the Target string. Make sure you add a space between the quotes and the dash, like this "....firefox.exe" -private.
mozilla firefox properties

Click on the OK button to confirm the change, and when you will open Firefox using this shortcut it will open in Private mode.

You will see the usual Private mode page along with the Private mode icon at the top of the browser.

Opera

To open private browsing mode in Opera, you can do the following steps:

  1. Right-click on any of the Opera shortcuts and click on Properties from the context menu.
  2. Similar to Firefox, you need to add -private at the end of the Target string with a space between the quotes and the dash.
opera properties

Finally, click on the OK button to apply the changes. Launch Opera using this shortcut and it will launch in Private mode.

Internet Explorer

Similar to other browsers in this list, you will also have to modify the Target box to make Internet Explorer open in Private mode by default.

However, in Windows 10 you will have to edit Internet Explorer’s original shortcut inside Windows Accessories, this will not work for custom made shortcuts.

To access the original shortcut, type Internet Explorer in the search bar and right-click on it. From the menu, select Open file location.

IE open file location

Windows Explorer will open up and you should be able to see Internet Explorer shortcut here. Right-click on it and then click on Properties from the context menu. Now add -private at the end of the Target string and click on OK to confirm it.

Now you can access Internet Explorer from any shortcut and it will always open in private mode.

internet explorer properties

Safari & Microsoft Edge

It seems both Safari and Microsoft Edge don’t allow you to change the default launch settings. For Microsoft Edge, I have tried modifying its shortcut from different areas.

Either the Target box was uneditable, or nothing happens after making the edits. For now, you’ll have to manually launch the private window when you will open the browser.

Wrap up

I will recommend you to create a separate shortcut for launching your favorite browser in private mode. As private mode also delete cookies and other useful information about the sites you visit, you may like to browse some website in normal mode for the ease of access.

Additionally, if you ever need to stop your browser from opening in private mode, simply revert the changes you have made.

Firefox 54 Could Very Well be Mozilla’s Best Browser

There was a time when Mozilla’s Firefox browser was the browser of choice for those who refused to use Internet Explorer. Unfortunately for Mozilla, the browser has been playing second fiddle to Google Chrome since 2011.

How to Optimize Firefox for Better Performance

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Now, the company is looking to regain the throne that Google took from it with the release of Firefox 54, and if the company is to be believed, the latest version of Firefox would be Mozilla’s finest yet.

The key to Firefox 54’s superiority lies in its speed. After years of relying on a single process to run all the tabs in a single browser, Mozilla has finally decided to adopt the “multiple process” technology that browsers like Chrome, Edge, Safari and many others have been using.

Codenamed Electrolysis or E10s, this technology will allow Firefox 54 to use up to four processes to run web page content across all open tabs. In practice, this would allow Firefox 54 to run faster while crashing less frequently.

runs faster and less crashing

In addition to better performance, Firefox 54 also has the honor of being the browser that consumes the least amount of RAM when compared to a number of other browsers running on Windows 10, macOS and Linux. This particular bit of info would be good news to those who have aging machines.

using the least of ram

Besides the major performance boost, Firefox 54 will also be introducing some minor changes to the browser’s features. A full list of changes can be found here.

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Firefox 54 Could Very Well be Mozilla’s Best Browser

There was a time when Mozilla’s Firefox browser was the browser of choice for those who refused to use Internet Explorer. Unfortunately for Mozilla, the browser has been playing second fiddle to Google Chrome since 2011.

Now, the company is looking to regain the throne that Google took from it with the release of Firefox 54, and if the company is to be believed, the latest version of Firefox would be Mozilla’s finest yet.

The key to Firefox 54’s superiority lies in its speed. After years of relying on a single process to run all the tabs in a single browser, Mozilla has finally decided to adopt the “multiple process” technology that browsers like Chrome, Edge, Safari and many others have been using.

Codenamed Electrolysis or E10s, this technology will allow Firefox 54 to use up to four processes to run web page content across all open tabs. In practice, this would allow Firefox 54 to run faster while crashing less frequently.

runs faster and less crashing

In addition to better performance, Firefox 54 also has the honor of being the browser that consumes the least amount of RAM when compared to a number of other browsers running on Windows 10, macOS and Linux. This particular bit of info would be good news to those who have aging machines.

using the least of ram

Besides the major performance boost, Firefox 54 will also be introducing some minor changes to the browser’s features. A full list of changes can be found here.

Firefox Test Pilot’s Snooze Tabs Can Help You Remove Distractions

Have you ever bumped into a webpage that has an interesting article but you can’t read it at the moment because you’re swamped in work? Well, if you’re a Firefox browser user, you can opt to “snooze” that page for perusal later as Firefox has introduced a new feature called SnoozeTabs.

50 Time Saving Firefox Add-ons

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Currently being tested out on Firefox’s Test Pilot program, SnoozeTabs will let you set a snooze timer on an open browser tab. All you have to do is click on the SnoozeTabs icon located next to the browser’s search bar, choose a time period in which you would like the tab to reappear again, and Firefox would immediately close down the tab.

Once the snooze period ends, Firefox would then reopen the tab in the background, allowing you to view said tab once you’re done with your work.

firefox snooze tab

The snooze time period available on SnoozeTabs ranges from “Later Today”, all the way up to a full month. Alternatively, if you have a specific time in which you know that you’re available, you can opt to input a custom time into SnoozeTabs instead.

One thing to note about SnoozeTabs is that it is still currently in its testing stages. As such, do expect some glitches and bugs with the feature. One such example can be seen in the screenshot provided above where the custom date option is noticeably missing from the menu. If you’re not a fan of buggy features, it’s probably wise to wait until the feature gets a final release.

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Firefox Test Pilot’s Snooze Tabs Can Help You Remove Distractions

Have you ever bumped into a webpage that has an interesting article but you can’t read it at the moment because you’re swamped in work? Well, if you’re a Firefox browser user, you can opt to “snooze” that page for perusal later as Firefox has introduced a new feature called SnoozeTabs.

Currently being tested out on Firefox’s Test Pilot program, SnoozeTabs will let you set a snooze timer on an open browser tab. All you have to do is click on the SnoozeTabs icon located next to the browser’s search bar, choose a time period in which you would like the tab to reappear again, and Firefox would immediately close down the tab.

Once the snooze period ends, Firefox would then reopen the tab in the background, allowing you to view said tab once you’re done with your work.

firefox snooze tab

The snooze time period available on SnoozeTabs ranges from “Later Today”, all the way up to a full month. Alternatively, if you have a specific time in which you know that you’re available, you can opt to input a custom time into SnoozeTabs instead.

One thing to note about SnoozeTabs is that it is still currently in its testing stages. As such, do expect some glitches and bugs with the feature. One such example can be seen in the screenshot provided above where the custom date option is noticeably missing from the menu. If you’re not a fan of buggy features, it’s probably wise to wait until the feature gets a final release.

10 Coolest Hidden Firefox Settings You Should Know

There are plenty of settings that Firefox offers besides general ones you can find in the Options menu. Many of these advanced settings can be found on specific browser pages that use the about: protocol. In this article, I’m going to show you 10 less-known Firefox settings that can come useful in your everyday workflow.

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When you visit any of the about: pages in the list below, and are prompted with a warning message, just click either the OK or the I’ll be careful, I promise! button — whichever one you encounter.

1. Perform DNS Lookup

You can perform an in-house DNS lookup (finding the IP address of a domain) in Firefox.

Type about:networking into the URL bar, and press Enter. On the upcoming page, click “DNS Lookup” in the sidebar menu, type the domain name, and click Resolve to see its IP address(es).

DNS Lookup
2. Block Auto-Refresh

Sometimes web pages come with Refresh HTTP headers that make pages refresh frequently.

If you want to stop that from happening, go to about:preferences#advanced, and under the subtitle Accessibility, check the checkbox labeled “Warn me when websites try to redirect or reload the page”.

Auto-Refresh Setting
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3. Search As You Type

Pressing Ctrl+F opens an in-page search-box in Firefox that allows users to search for a string in a webpage. But it’s possible to spare the key combo pressing and start searching as you start typing.

In the “Accessibility” section of the about:preferences#advanced page check the checkbox labeled “Search for text when I start typing”.

Search As You Type setting

From now on, when you start typing, and the cursor isn’t in a text input field on the page, Firefox will immediately start looking for the text on the web page.

4. Unmap Backspace Key

To prevent being surprised by someone trying to sneakily backspace their way into your browser history, you can replace the backspace action with one that scrolls the page up on pressing Backspace, scrolls it down on Shift + Backspace. You can also configure the Backspace key not to give any action at all.

Go to about:config, and type browser.backspace_action into the search bar. The default value of this browser setting is 0.

Unmap Backspace Key setting

Double-click on it, and change it to 1 for mapping scrolling action to the Backspace key, or change it to 2 for unmapping it from any action.

5. Move Around With Cursor Keys

Reading a long article or story online, and want more control while jumping line? You can use the cursor for in-text navigation.

Under “Accessibility” on the about:preferences#advanced page, check the option “Always use the cursor keys to navigate within pages”.

Move Around With Cursor Keys setting

Besides the default arrow cursor, a blinking text cursor will also appear on websites. You can move it around by using the arrow keys.

6. Paste On Middle Click

Got a mouse with a middle button? Use it to paste text from the clipboard into text fields on web pages.

Go to about:config, and type middlemouse.paste into the search bar. The default value is false, double-click on it, and change it to true.

Paste On Middle Click setting
7. Customize Print Header & Footer

When you print a web page in Firefox, it uses a default layout. At the top-left corner of the print page there’s the title of the web page, at top-right the URL, at bottom-left the page number of total pages, and at bottom-right the date-time.

You can change this arrangement, for instance you can add something to the center of the header or footer, remove some of the default info altogether, or replace them with your custom text.

On the about:config page, there are six settings for the customization the print header and footer:

  1. print.print_headercenter
  2. print.print_headerleft
  3. print.print_headerright
  4. print.print_footercenter
  5. print.print_footerleft
  6. print.print_footerright
Print Header Custom Setting
Print Footer Custom Setting

You need to type the name of the setting from the above list into the search bar on the about:config page in order to change its value. The value can be any of the following strings, or your custom text:

  1. &D – Date-time
  2. &P – Page number
  3. &PT – Page number of total pages
  4. &T – Title of the web page
  5. &U – URL
8. Change Default Colors

You have the option to change the default background, text, and link colors in Firefox.

Go to about:preferences#content, click on the Colors… in the “Fonts & Colors” section, and select the new colors.

Color Setting
9. Filter Awesome Bar Links

Awesome Bar, the location bar of Firefox shows a list of links when you start typing. The displayed links are taken from your bookmarks, browser history and currently open pages.

You can filter these Awesome Bar links by typing one of the following special characters into the location bar, either before your query or just on its own:

  1. # – Match page title
  2. @ – Match URL
  3. * – Match only to links in bookmarks
  4. ^ – Match only to links in history
  5. + – Match only to links that’re tagged
  6. % – Match only to links that are open currently
Awesomebar with Open Tab Filter
Awesomebar with Open Tab Filter and Input
10. Auto-Export Bookmarks In HTML

If you want Firefox to auto-save your bookmarks in HTML format as a list of links, you can do so by going to about:config, typing browser.bookmarks.autoExportHTML into the search bar, and changing the default false value to true by double-clicking on it.

Bookmark Setting

When you restart your browser, a file named bookmarks.html will appear in your Firefox profile folder with all the bookmark links.

To see your profile folder, go to about:support, and press the button Show Folder. Note that you may need to restart your whole system to make the change take effect.

From now on, every time you exit Firefox, the bookmarks.html file will be updated with your current list of bookmarks.

10 Coolest Hidden Firefox Settings You Should Know

There are plenty of settings that Firefox offers besides general ones you can find in the Options menu. Many of these advanced settings can be found on specific browser pages that use the about: protocol. In this article, I’m going to show you 10 less-known Firefox settings that can come useful in your everyday workflow.

When you visit any of the about: pages in the list below, and are prompted with a warning message, just click either the OK or the I’ll be careful, I promise! button — whichever one you encounter.

1. Perform DNS Lookup

You can perform an in-house DNS lookup (finding the IP address of a domain) in Firefox.

Type about:networking into the URL bar, and press Enter. On the upcoming page, click “DNS Lookup” in the sidebar menu, type the domain name, and click Resolve to see its IP address(es).

DNS Lookup
2. Block Auto-Refresh

Sometimes web pages come with Refresh HTTP headers that make pages refresh frequently.

If you want to stop that from happening, go to about:preferences#advanced, and under the subtitle Accessibility, check the checkbox labeled “Warn me when websites try to redirect or reload the page”.

Auto-Refresh Setting
3. Search As You Type

Pressing Ctrl+F opens an in-page search-box in Firefox that allows users to search for a string in a webpage. But it’s possible to spare the key combo pressing and start searching as you start typing.

In the “Accessibility” section of the about:preferences#advanced page check the checkbox labeled “Search for text when I start typing”.

Search As You Type setting

From now on, when you start typing, and the cursor isn’t in a text input field on the page, Firefox will immediately start looking for the text on the web page.

4. Unmap Backspace Key

To prevent being surprised by someone trying to sneakily backspace their way into your browser history, you can replace the backspace action with one that scrolls the page up on pressing Backspace, scrolls it down on Shift + Backspace. You can also configure the Backspace key not to give any action at all.

Go to about:config, and type browser.backspace_action into the search bar. The default value of this browser setting is 0.

Unmap Backspace Key setting

Double-click on it, and change it to 1 for mapping scrolling action to the Backspace key, or change it to 2 for unmapping it from any action.

5. Move Around With Cursor Keys

Reading a long article or story online, and want more control while jumping line? You can use the cursor for in-text navigation.

Under “Accessibility” on the about:preferences#advanced page, check the option “Always use the cursor keys to navigate within pages”.

Move Around With Cursor Keys setting

Besides the default arrow cursor, a blinking text cursor will also appear on websites. You can move it around by using the arrow keys.

6. Paste On Middle Click

Got a mouse with a middle button? Use it to paste text from the clipboard into text fields on web pages.

Go to about:config, and type middlemouse.paste into the search bar. The default value is false, double-click on it, and change it to true.

Paste On Middle Click setting
7. Customize Print Header & Footer

When you print a web page in Firefox, it uses a default layout. At the top-left corner of the print page there’s the title of the web page, at top-right the URL, at bottom-left the page number of total pages, and at bottom-right the date-time.

You can change this arrangement, for instance you can add something to the center of the header or footer, remove some of the default info altogether, or replace them with your custom text.

On the about:config page, there are six settings for the customization the print header and footer:

  1. print.print_headercenter
  2. print.print_headerleft
  3. print.print_headerright
  4. print.print_footercenter
  5. print.print_footerleft
  6. print.print_footerright
Print Header Custom Setting
Print Footer Custom Setting

You need to type the name of the setting from the above list into the search bar on the about:config page in order to change its value. The value can be any of the following strings, or your custom text:

  1. &D – Date-time
  2. &P – Page number
  3. &PT – Page number of total pages
  4. &T – Title of the web page
  5. &U – URL
8. Change Default Colors

You have the option to change the default background, text, and link colors in Firefox.

Go to about:preferences#content, click on the Colors… in the “Fonts & Colors” section, and select the new colors.

Color Setting
9. Filter Awesome Bar Links

Awesome Bar, the location bar of Firefox shows a list of links when you start typing. The displayed links are taken from your bookmarks, browser history and currently open pages.

You can filter these Awesome Bar links by typing one of the following special characters into the location bar, either before your query or just on its own:

  1. # – Match page title
  2. @ – Match URL
  3. * – Match only to links in bookmarks
  4. ^ – Match only to links in history
  5. + – Match only to links that’re tagged
  6. % – Match only to links that are open currently
Awesomebar with Open Tab Filter
Awesomebar with Open Tab Filter and Input
10. Auto-Export Bookmarks In HTML

If you want Firefox to auto-save your bookmarks in HTML format as a list of links, you can do so by going to about:config, typing browser.bookmarks.autoExportHTML into the search bar, and changing the default false value to true by double-clicking on it.

Bookmark Setting

When you restart your browser, a file named bookmarks.html will appear in your Firefox profile folder with all the bookmark links.

To see your profile folder, go to about:support, and press the button Show Folder. Note that you may need to restart your whole system to make the change take effect.

From now on, every time you exit Firefox, the bookmarks.html file will be updated with your current list of bookmarks.

How to Customize Firefox Reader View for Better Readability

Reader View is a popular feature of the Firefox browser, that changes the appearance of a web page, and makes it more readable by removing visual clutter such as images, ads, headers, and sidebars. Reader View is, however not available, for all home pages.

If the feature is available for a certain page, you will find the icon to enable it in the shape of a small book icon displayed to the right of the address bar.

IMAGE: Mozilla.org

There are a few built-in options that allow readers to customize the look of the Reader View. We’ll be looking at those options before showing you what you can do to further personalize the look of the Reader View. For demo purposes, I will be using an article by National Geographic article.

Pre-Built Options

Firefox Reader View comes with a few pre-built customization options such as dark, light and sepia backgrounds, adjustable font sizes, and serif and sans-serif typefaces. You can customize the theme by overriding the CSS rules of these pre-existing options.

Default Reader View Options
Default Reader View Options

I use a dark skin with serif fonts, and this means that I will need to override the belonging CSS classes, in my case .dark and .serif.

If you want to customize another theme variant (skin + font), you will need to use the appropriate CSS selectors. You can check these out with the help of the Firefox Developer Tools by hitting F12.

Check CSS Selectors
Create the Custom CSS File

You need to create a file called userContent.css inside the chrome folder of your Firefox profile folder for your Reader View customizations. To find your Firefox profile folder, type about:support into the URL bar and press Enter.

You’ll find yourself on a page that contains the technical data related to your Firefox install. Click the Show Folder button, and it will open your Profile folder.

Profile Folder Button in Firefox
the Profile Folder button

Create a folder called chrome inside your Profile Folder (if you don’t have it yet), and a file called userContent.css inside the chrome folder. The file path looks like this:

...ProfileschromeuserContent.css
Add the Custom CSS Rules

Once you’ve created and opened userContent.css in a code editor, it’s time to add your CSS rules. In order to customize the design of the Reader View, you need to target the tag with the appropriate selectors.

You can use the following selectors for the different default options:

/* When dark background is selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark  {
}
/* When light background is selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.light  {
}
/* When sepia background is selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.sepia  {
}
/* When serif font is selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.serif {
}
/* When sans-serif font is selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.sans-serif {
}

You can also combine the classes, to target a specific combination of settings.

/* When dark background and serif font are selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif  {
}
/* When sepia background and sans-serif font are selected */
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.sans-serif.sepia  {
}

Do not use the common selector :root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body to target all the settings at once. It will work, but it will also affect other browser pages, such as about:newtab, as their root elements also carry the hasbrowserhandlers attribute (which is used to mark the event handlers of internal Firefox pages, such as about: pages).

Here’s the code I added to my userContent.css. I changed the font family, font style, colors, and widened the text container. You can use any other style rules according to your own taste.

/** userContent.css
***************************/
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif,
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif #reader-domain {
font-family: "courier new" !important;
}
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif {
background-color: #13131F !important;
color: #BAE3DB !important;
}
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif #reader-domain {
font-style: italic !important;
}
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif h1,
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif h2,
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif h3,
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif h4,
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif h5 {
color: #06FEB0 !important;
}
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif a:link {
color: #83E7FF !important;
}
:root[hasbrowserhandlers="true"] body.dark.serif #container {
max-width: 50em !important;
}

Note that it’s necessary to use the !important keyword in userContent.css for all CSS rules. The browser adds user-specified property values before the values specified by the author (the developer of the given web page, here the Reader View).
Hence, any user-specified property value without the !important keyword won’t work if an author-specified stylesheet also targets the same property, as it will be overridden.

Final Result

You can see the changes of my Reader View theme below. Use your own CSS rules to customize the design of your own personalized Firefox Reader View.

Before

Default Firefox Reader View
default Firefox Reader View

After

Customized Firefox Reader View
customized Firefox Reader View

If you want to dive deeper in the theme customization of Firefox tools, check out my previous tutorial on the customization of the Firefox Developer Tools theme.