Extensions in Firefox 82

Firefox

Before we get to the Firefox 82 updates, I want to let you know that Philipp has passed the baton for these blog posts over to me. I plan to stick to the same format you know and hopefully love, but leave a comment if there’s anything you’d like to see change in future installments.

Language Packs

Starting with Firefox 82, language packs will be updated in tandem with Firefox updates. Users with an active language pack will no longer have to deal with the hassle of defaulting back to English while the language pack update is pending delivery.

Misc updates in Firefox 82

The cookie permission is no longer required in order to obtain the cookieStoreId for a tab, making it possible to identify container tabs without additional permissions.

The error message logged when a webRequest event listener is passed invalid match patterns in the urls value is now much easier to understand.

Firefox site isolation by default starting in Nightly 83

As mentioned earlier, we’re working on a big change to Firefox that isolates sites from one another. In the next few weeks, we’ll be rolling out an experiment to enable isolation by default for most Nightly users, starting in Firefox 83, with plans for a similar experiment on Beta by the end of the year.

For extensions that deal with screenshots, we’ve extended the captureTab and captureVisibleTab methods to enable capturing an arbitrary area of the page, outside the currently visible viewport. This should cover functionality previously enabled by the (long deprecated) drawWindow method, and you can find more details about new rect and scale options on the ImageDetails MDN page.

While we haven’t seen many reports of extension incompatibilities till now, Fission is a big architectural change to Firefox, and the web platform has many corner cases. You can help us find anything we missed by testing your extensions with Fission enabled, and reporting any issues on Bugzilla.

Thanks

Thank you to Michael Goossens for his multiple contributions to this release.

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Download Statistics Update

In June, we announced that we were making changes to add-on usage statistics on addons.mozilla.org (AMO).  Now, we’re making a similar change to add-on download statistics. These statistics are aggregated from the AMO server logs, do not contain any personally identifiable information, and are only available to add-ons developers via the Developer Hub.

Just like with usage stats, the new download stats will be less expensive to process and will be based on Firefox telemetry data. As users can opt out of telemetry reporting, the new download numbers will be generally lower than those reported from the server logs. Additionally, the download numbers are based on new telemetry introduced in Firefox 80, so they will be lower at first and increase as users update their Firefox. As before, we will only count downloads originating from AMO.

The good news is that it’ll be easier now to track attribution for downloads. The old download stats were based on a custom src parameter in the URL. The new ones will break down sources with the more standard UTM parameters, making it easier to measure the effect of social media and other online campaigns.

Here’s a preview of what the new downloads dashboard will look like:

A screenshot of the updated statistics dashboard

We expect to turn on the new downloads data on October 8. Make sure to export your current download numbers if you’re interested in preserving them.

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Extensions in Firefox 81

In Firefox 81, we have improved error messages for extension developers and updated user-facing notifications  to provide more information on how extensions are modifying their settings.

For developers, the menus.create API now provides more meaningful error messages when supplying invalid match or url patterns.  This updated message should make it easier for developers to quickly identify and fix the error. In addition, webNavigation.getAllFrames and webNavigation.getFrame will return a promise resolved with null in case the tab is discarded, which is how these APIs behave in Chrome.

For users, we’ve added a notification when an add-on is controlling the “Ask to save logins and passwords for websites” setting, using the privacy.services.passwordSavingEnabled settings API. Users can see this notification in their preferences or by navigating to about:preferences#privacy.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/Sy7Q3cLUc8lkcMvj6HI1hUKA7dM0YjkZnlHkFxVM3UeNjmGUzAeqbxTDlDdL2rCdZgKNa9KCkbioBvo_rQSHWkTcnSoAUIyxeBa4z7kkghffAvwfseVFopCmnJ1KX-ZF8FatwLSI

Thank you Deepika Karanji for improving the error messages, and our WebExtensions and security engineering teams for making these changes possible. We’re looking forward to seeing what is next for Firefox 82.

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Introducing the Promoted Add-ons Pilot

Today, we are launching a pilot program to give developers a way to promote their add-ons on addons.mozilla.org (AMO). This pilot program, which will run between the end of September and the end of November 2020, aims to expand the number of add-ons we can review and verify as compliant with Mozilla policies, and provides developers with options for boosting their discoverability on AMO.

 

Building Upon Recommended Extensions

We strive to maintain a balance between openness for our development ecosystem and security and privacy for our users. Last summer, we launched a program called Recommended Extensions consisting of a relatively small number of editorially chosen add-ons that are regularly reviewed for policy compliance and prominently recommended on AMO and other Mozilla channels. All other add-ons display a caution label on their listing pages letting users know that we may not have reviewed these add-ons.

We would love to review all add-ons on AMO for policy compliance, but the cost would be prohibitive because they are performed by humans. Still, developers often tell us they would like to have their add-ons reviewed and featured on AMO, and some have indicated a willingness to pay for these services if we provide them.

Introducing Promoted Add-ons

To support these developers, we are adding a new program called Promoted Add-ons, where add-ons can be manually reviewed and featured on the AMO homepage for a fee. Offering these services as paid options will help us expand the number of add-ons that are verified and give developers more ways to gain users.

There will be two levels of paid services available:

  • “Verified” badging: Developers will have all new versions of their add-on reviewed for security and policy compliance. If the add-on passes, it will receive a Verified badge on AMO and in the Firefox Add-ons Manager (about:addons). The caution label will no longer appear on the add-on’s AMO listing page.

Add-on listing page example with verified badge

  • Sponsored placement on the AMO homepage. Developers of add-ons that have a Verified badge have the option to reach more users by paying an additional fee for placement in a new Sponsored section of the AMO homepage. The AMO homepage receives about two million unique visits per month.

AMO Homepage with Sponsored Ssection

During the pilot program, these services will be provided to a small number of participants without cost. More details will be provided to participants and the larger community about the program, including pricing, in the coming months.

Sign up for the Pilot Program

If you are interested in participating in this pilot program, click here to sign up. Please note that space will be limited based on the following criteria and restrictions:

  • Your add-on must be listed on addons.mozilla.org.
  • You (or your company) must be based in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, the United Kingdom, Malaysia, or Singapore, because once the pilot ends, we can only accept payment from these countries. (If you’re interested in participating but live outside these regions, please sign up to join the waitlist. We’re currently looking into how we can expand to more countries.)
  • Up to 12 add-ons will be accepted to the pilot program due to our current capacity for manual reviews. We will prioritize add-ons that are actively maintained and have an established user base.
  • Prior to receiving the Verified badge, a participating add-on will need to pass manual review. This may require some time commitment from developers to respond to potential review requests in a timely manner.
  • Add-ons in the Recommended Extensions program do not need to apply, because they already receive verification and discovery benefits.

We’ll begin notifying developers who are selected to participate in the program on September 16, 2020. We may expand the program in the future if interest grows, so the sign-up sheet will remain open if you would like to join the waitlist.

Next Steps

We expect Verified badges and homepage sponsorships for pilot participants to go live in early October. We’ll run the pilot for a few weeks to monitor its performance and communicate the next phase in November.

For developers who do not wish to participate in this program but are interested in more ways to support their add-ons, we plan to streamline the contribution experience later this year and explore features that make it easier for people to financially support the add-ons they use regularly. These features will be free to all add-on developers, and remain available whether or not the Promoted Add-ons pilot graduates.

We look forward to your participation, and hope you stay tuned for updates! If you have any questions about the program, please post them to our community forum.

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Update on extension support in the new Firefox for Android

Firefox

Last week, we finished rolling out the new Firefox for Android experience. This launch was the culmination of a year and a half of work rebuilding the mobile browser for Android from the ground up, replacing the previous application’s codebase with GeckoView—Mozilla’s new mobile browser engine—to create a fast, private, and customizable mobile browser. With GeckoView, our mobile development team can build and ship features much faster than before. The launch is a starting point for our new Android experience, and we’re excited to continue developing and refining features.

This means continuing to build support for add-ons. In order to get the new browser to users as soon as possible—which was necessary to iterate quickly on user feedback and limit resources needed to maintain two different Firefox for Android applications—we made some tough decisions about our minimum criteria for launch. We looked at add-on usage on Android, and made the decision to start by building support for add-ons in the Recommended Extensions program that were commonly installed by our mobile users. Enabling a small number of extensions in the initial rollout also enabled us to ensure a good first experience with add-ons in the new browser that are both mobile-friendly and security-reviewed.

More Recommended Extensions will be enabled on release in the coming weeks as they are tested and optimized. We are also working on enabling support for persistent loading of all extensions listed on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) on Firefox for Android Nightly. This should make it easier for mobile developers to test for compatibility, and for interested users to access add-ons that are not yet available on release. You can follow our progress by subscribing to this issue. We expect to have this enabled later this month.

Our plans for add-on support on release have not been solidified beyond what is outlined above. However, we are continuously working on increasing support, taking into account usage and feedback to ensure we are making the most of our available resources. We will post updates to this blog as plans solidify each quarter.

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