Microsoft introduces Caret Browsing feature in Chromium Edge

Work on the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser continues and Microsoft adds new features to preview versions of the browser on a weekly basis. The latest build introduces Caret Browsing, an accessibility feature, in the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser.

The feature is hidden behind an experimental flag currently and the functionality is only available in the Canary version of Microsoft Edge. It will take some time before it reaches other beta channels of the browser; a stable version of the browser is not yet available.

Caret Browsing enables navigation on the webpage and text selection with the keyboard on webpages in Microsoft Edge when enabled.

Caret Browsing is a native feature of Internet Explorer, the classic Microsoft Edge web browser, and the Mozilla Firefox web browser. Users of these browsers tap on F7 on the keyboard to enable Caret Browsing in the web browser.

Chromium users may download the Google Caret Browsing extension from the Chrome Web Store to integrate the functionality in Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers such as Vivaldi, Opera, or Brave.

Microsoft identified several issues that drove the company’s decision to integrate Caret Browsing natively in the Edge browser. Most notable, users had to search and install the extension to use it, and issues such as problems with certain Enterprise policies that were caused by delivering the feature as an extension.

microsoft edge caret browsing

Here is what you need to do currently to enable the feature in Microsoft Edge:

  1. Load edge://flags/#edge-caret-browsing in the browser’s address bar.
  2. Set the status of the feature to Enabled.
  3. Restart Microsoft Edge.

Setting the flag to Enabled turns Caret Browsing on in Microsoft Edge. You need to enable the feature manually, however, in each session to make use of it. The description of the flag does not reveal information on how to enable it.

All you have to do is press F7 on the keyboard to enable Caret browsing in Edge. Edge displays a “turn on caret browsing” prompt by default. Select “turn on” to enable it. You may check the “Don’t ask me again when I press F7” box to disable the prompt in future sessions and enable Caret browsing just by tapping on the F7 key.

Once you have enabled the feature you may use the up-down-left-right keys on the keyboard to navigate the webpage.  Interaction with elements on the webpage is also possible; hit the Enter-key to load the target of links, or hold down the Shift-key and use the cursor keys to select text which you may copy using Ctrl-C.

Closing Words

Caret Browsing is an experimental feature at the time of writing and that explains why it needs to be enabled manually using a flag before it becomes available. Microsoft will integrate the feature natively eventually so that it does not need to be enabled using the flag.

Caret Browsing is another feature that distinguishes the Chromium-based Edge from Google Chrome.

Now You: What is your take on Caret Browsing?

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Windows Spellchecker in Edge, Chrome, and other Chromium browsers

Microsoft’s decision to switch to Chromium as the source for the company’s Edge browser has injected even more development resources into the project.

One of the latest commits by Microsoft engineers introduces support for the Windows Spellchecker in Chromium.

Any changes to the classic version of Microsoft Edge benefited that browser only previously. With Microsoft now focusing its energy on Chromium, any improvements made to Chromium benefit all other Chromium-based browsers as a consequence.

In other words: the Windows Spellchecker will be available as an option in the new Microsoft Edge, in Google Chrome, and in other Chromium-based browsers such as Vivaldi, Opera, or Brave provided that the companies behind these browsers don’t block the flag in their browsers.

Google does not seem to have any objections to that as it is already possible to flip the default spellchecker of the Chrome browser to the Windows Spellchecker.

windows spellchecker chrome

There is one caveat, however. Since we are talking about the spellchecker of the Windows operating system, the option to switch to it is only available on Windows.

Also, the feature is currently only available in development versions of some browsers, e.g. Chrome Canary, and not in stable versions (there is not even a stable Edge based on Chromium out there). The new option is not available in any Microsoft Edge versions right now.

So, to enable it right now, here is what you need to do:

  1. Load chrome://flags in the browser’s address bar. Note that other browsers may use a different protocol for internal pages. Microsoft Edge uses edge://flags, and the same may be true for other Chromium-based browsers.
  2. Search for spellchecker.
  3. The result “Use the Windows OS spellchecker” should be returned.
  4. Set the flag to Enabled.
  5. Restart the browser.

Enabled means that the browser will use the spellchecker of the Windows operating system from that moment on and not the default Chromium spellchecker. Windows Latest, the site that discovered the new option, notes that Chromium uses Hunspell by default. Hunspell is used by a wide variety of projects including LibreOffice, OpenOffice, Google Chrome, Mac OS X, Opera, and others.

The commit on the Chromium website offers the following insight into the change:

This CL aims to implement windows spellchecker integration in Chromium project, so that user can switch to use windows spellchecker or hunspell spellchecker at run time. We need to implement platform agnostic interfaces to integrate windows spellchecker into Chromium. We also need to refactor some code to enable runtime switch between Windows spellchecker and hunspell spellchecker.

It may be difficult to spot the change right away as you’d need to have some data at hand for comparison. One example would be a word that the default spellchecker does not suggest to correct while the Windows spellchecker does.

Closing Words

Microsoft adding features to Chromium is good news for any user who uses a Chromium-based browser; Mozilla on the other hand has even tougher competition to deal with as a consequence.

Now You: do you make use of a spellchecker in your browser of choice?

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A look at Microsoft Edge's Tracking Prevention feature

Microsoft just added a new feature called Tracking Prevention to the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser; reason enough to take a look at it to find out what it does.

Tracking Prevention is only available in the latest Microsoft Edge Canary version at the time of writing. The feature is not enabled by default; in fact, it is hidden behind an experimental flag currently. All of this will change when the first final version of the new Microsoft Edge browser is released.

Before we look at the feature in detail, it is necessary to describe what it does. Microsoft describes Tracking Prevention in Edge in the following way:

Websites use trackers (like cookies and scripts) to collect info about how you use their sites and show you content like relevant ads. But some trackers collect and send your info to sites you haven’t visited. Microsoft Edge helps you control trackers.

The wording may sound familiar to Firefox users as it is pretty close to what Tracking Protection used to offer initially in Mozilla’s web browser.

Tracking Prevention configuration

microsoft edge tracking protection

Tracking Prevention comes with three different presets that users may switch between.

  • Basic — Blocks malicious trackers but allows those that show you relevant ads
  • Balanced (recommended) — Blocks malicious trackers and some third-party trackers. You’ll see less relevant ads.
  • Strict — Blocks the majority of third-party trackers, some sites might break

The default level is balanced. Edge users may switch levels on edge://settings/privacy in the browser’s Settings. An option to turn off the feature for specific sites is provided as well on the page.

The changes that you make on the page apply instantly, a restart is not required. You do need to reload tabs, however.

The Tracking Prevention flag

tracking prevention

Tracking Prevention is not available by default right now. Edge users need to enable an experimental flag first before it becomes available.

  1. Load edge://flags/#edge-tracking-prevention
  2. Set the flag to Enabled.
  3. Restart the browser.

Once restarted, Edge displays the new Tracking Prevention options under Privacy in the Settings.

How effective is it?

Tracking Prevention, just like Mozilla’s Tracking Protection feature, is not an ad-blocker. While the feature may block some ad units when enabled, it is not as effective as full-blown content blockers such as uBlock Origin.

I ran a quick test on some sites, Ghacks and YouTube in particular, to find out what Balanced and Strict modes in Edge would do.

Advertisement was displayed in Balanced mode on Ghacks but the units were blocked when I switched to Strict mode. YouTube continued to display advertisement regardless of the level I set Tracking Prevention to.

Closing Words

Tracking Prevention blocks some tracker connections and it may reduce the impact of tracking on the Internet while the feature is active but just like Firefox’s Tracking Protection, it does take care of just one side of the medal when it comes to problems associated with advertisement on today’s Internet.

Taking care of tracking is a step in the right direction but as long as advertising companies such as Google don’t address other advertising-related issues such as malvertising campaigns, it is not effective enough.

Edge users may install Edge-exclusive extensions and also extensions for Google Chrome.

Now You: What would have to happen before you’d relinquish content blockers?

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Microsoft releases Microsoft Edge Chromium Group Policies preview

Microsoft released an early preview of the policies that it plans to support in the Microsoft Edge Chromium web browser.

Microsoft Edge Chromium, much like the classic Microsoft Edge browser, Google’s Chrome web browser or Mozilla’s Firefox browser, supports policies that administrators may set.

The administrative template is available as a preview that has some limitations currently. The templates are only available in English (US), don’t include policies for updates as Microsoft plans to release those in a separate administrative template file, and may change before the final release as policies may be added, changed, or removed based on feedback and development.

All that is required is to download the administrative template for Microsoft Edge to the local system and add it to the Group Policy.

If you are just interested in the available policies check out the HTML file that lists them all in the common folder. The HTML file lists all included policies in the template; each policy has a link to a details page that contains the description and other information useful to administrators.

microsoft edge policies

You can check out our instructions for adding Chrome templates to the Group Policy, or follow these basic steps to integrate the template:

  1. Download the Administrative Template from the Microsoft Tech Community website.
  2. Extract the zip archive on the local system. Note that it includes policies for Windows and Mac.
  3. Open the Group Policy Editor, e.g. by opening Start, typing gpedit.msc and selecting the item from the list of results.
  4. Right-click on Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates, and select Add/Remove Templates.
  5. Click on Add in the window that opens and browse to the location of the Microsoft Edge templates file.
  6. Select Close to end the process.

microsoft edge  chromium templates

You find the new policies in the Group Policy Editor afterward. All changes that administrators make are saved in the Registry under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftEdge. The policies for the old Microsoft Edge browser are saved to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftMicrosoftEdge instead.

Closing Words

The release of administrative templates for Microsoft Edge Chromium marks another important step towards a final release of the web browser. Microsoft has yet to announce an official release date for the new Edge version; a stable version is not available yet.

Microsoft released preview versions of the browser for Windows 7 and 8.1 this week. (via)

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Microsoft Edge Chromium for Windows 7 and 8.1 released

Microsoft announced the official availability of preview versions of the company’s Microsoft Edge Chromium web browser for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 today.

The Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser uses the same core that Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers such as Vivaldi, Opera, or Brave uses.

Microsoft released the browser for its Windows 10 operating system initially but it is now also available for Apple Macintosh devices and now also for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. A version for Linux distributions has not been released yet.

The official release of the preview versions of Microsoft Edge Chromium is the first version of Microsoft Edge that the company released for its Windows 7 and 8.1 operating systems. When Microsoft released the original Microsoft Edge browser in 2015, it made the browser Windows 10 exclusive.

Microsoft’s strategy back then was focused on Windows 10 and feature limitations were one of the methods the company used to get users to upgrade to Windows 10 or select Windows 10 from the get-go.

microsoft edge chromium windows 7 8

Downloads are available already on the official Microsoft Edge Insider website. Just visit the website and hit the download button next to the operating system that you want to install the Chromium-based Edge on.

Only the Canary Channel edition is currently available for Windows 7 and 8.1 operating systems. Canary is the cutting edge development version. The Dev Channel version is available for Windows 10 already, and first Beta Channel versions are expected soon.

Microsoft notes that the experience on these older platforms is “largely the same” as on Windows 10 and that features such as the upcoming Internet Explorer mode will become available on Windows 7 and 8.1 devices as well.

The new Microsoft Edge browser differs in some regards from Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers; it comes with a small set of extensions available only for the browser and does a few things better than Google Chrome.

Microsoft has yet to reveal a release date for the final version of the new Microsoft Edge Chromium web browser.

Now You: Did you try the new Edge already? What is your take on the browser?

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Microsoft Edge (Chromium) may also block media keys on Windows 10

The most recent development versions of the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser comes with a new feature that uses media controls on Windows 10 devices.

Google started to enable a feature in Chrome in 2019 that would react to media key activations on the keyboard. While that meant that Chrome users can control media playback using these keys, it had the negative effect that it blocked other apps from interacting with the media keys.

Spotify users noticed, for example, that they could not control the application anymore using media hardware keys if Chrome was open.

The new Microsoft Edge browser is based on Chromium and it supports the same functionality in recent builds so that media can be controlled in Microsoft Edge using hardware media keys.

Microsoft’s upcoming browser supports several features that Chrome does not support. It supports 4K Netflix playback just like the classic Edge browser, and offers other features that Google Chrome does not support.

Google and Microsoft engineers collaborated on the feature and improved it further since the initial release in Chrome.

The most recent editions of the browser display thumbnail icons in the media overlay when media keys are used while media is playing in the browsers.

chrome edge overlay media controls

The feature works on many media sites including YouTube and it displays a thumbnail of the video in the media overlay.

The overlay displays part of the title of the video, the current volume, and options to pause the video. Forward and backward options are also present.

Microsoft Edge reacts to hardware media keys when they are activated on the system if it is the active application.

Users who use media keys to control other applications, e.g. Spotify, will notice that they cannot do so anymore if Edge is active.

Edge users can disable the feature in the web browser to disable the behavior. The option exists currently but it is linked to a flag that may be removed at one point in time from the browser.

edge hardware keys handling

Here is how you disable media keys usage in Microsoft Edge:

  1. Load edge://flags/#hardware-media-key-handling
  2. Set the flag to Disabled.
  3. Restart Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft Edge won’t react to the pressing of media keys on the computer keyboard anymore after the flag is disabled. You can undo the change at anytime by setting the flag to Default or Enabled.

Now You: do you use Media Keys?

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Microsoft: tell us if you want us to build an ad blocker into Edge

Microsoft’s Edge development team held an interesting AMA on Reddit yesterday. AMA, for those who don’t know, is a questions and answers type of thread in which Reddit users post questions or remarks to individuals, teams, or company representatives.

Microsoft is working on a new version of the Edge browser that is based on Chromium code; that’s the same basis that Google Chrome, Opera, Vivaldi, or Brave use for their browsers.

The browser is available as a preview for Windows and Mac operating systems but it is only a matter of time before it replaces the current version of Microsoft Edge that is only available in Windows 10.

One of the questions that Microsoft’s Edge team was asked repeatedly was how Microsoft plans to react to Google’s extension changes in the Manifest V3 that would impact ad blockers if released right now.

The team noted that it was still evaluating Manifest V3 and that it was not ready to release an official comment about it at the time. It noted, however, that it recognizes that ad blocking is important to a lot of users and that the team started several things to address this.

microsoft edge ad blocker built-in

Besides being a member of the Coalition for Better Ads, Microsoft’s Edge Development Team noted that it was “committed to a strong extension ecosystem” and that this included ad blocking. Microsoft would not “artificially restrict ad blocking for business reasons related to advertising” and that the company got requests to integrate an ad blocking experience into the Edge browser.

Microsoft’s stance in regards to that is that it believes that extensions offer the best option right now, but that it would love to hear from users who think ad blocking should be built-in.

Finally, we occasionally hear requests for a built in ad blocking experiences in Edge. For most users, we find that extensions (combined with strong defaults around tracking prevention) are the best option here because you can choose from a variety of experiences and defaults, but we absolutely want to hear from you if you think this should be built in.

While that does not mean that Edge will get built-in ad blocking, it is certainly a possibility and not outright rejected by Microsoft.

Integration of an ad blocker could certainly improve the browser’s chance of becoming more successful than the classic version of Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer. The new Edge offers some features already that set it apart from Google Chrome.

Now You: Would you like to see ad blocking built-into Microsoft Edge?

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First look at Grammar Tools in the new Microsoft Edge

Microsoft’s upcoming Chromium-based web browser Microsoft Edge comes with Grammar Tools in the browser’s reading mode.

Reading mode is a useful feature of the browser that resembles services, scripts and browser extensions such as Tranquility for Firefox, the web service Readable, the now-retired Readability service and extension, and many others.

What sets it apart is that it is built-in the Microsoft Edge web browser similarly to how recent versions of the Firefox web browser come with such a mode.

Reader Mode is not a new feature, Microsoft added it to Internet Explorer 11 in 2014, and the classic Edge browser supports it as well.

Grammar Tools are part of Reader Mode in Microsoft Edge. The classic Edge browser supports Grammar Tools and the upcoming Microsoft Edge that is based on Chromium will as well. A core difference is that users of the classic Microsoft Edge browser have to download Grammar Tools from the Microsoft Store while the feature is integrated in the new Microsoft Edge browser natively.

Note that the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser is still in development and that things may change before final release. Right now, Grammar Tools is available in the latest builds but it is hidden behind a flag.

Enabling Grammar Tools in Microsoft Edge

microsoft edge grammar tools

Right now, it is necessary to enable Grammar Tools before the tools become available. Here is how that is done:

  1. Load edge://flags in the Microsoft Edge address bar.
  2. Use the search to find Grammar.
  3. Set the status of Grammar Tools in Reading View to enabled.
  4. Restart Microsoft Edge.

Grammar Tools are enabled in Reading View mode after the restart. You may launch Reading View mode on most sites with a click on the “open book” icon in the Edge address bar.

Microsoft Edge displays only article titles, text, and images afterward. Any other page element of the site is removed including menus, navigation, or advertisement.

A click on Grammar Tools at the top displays the available options. Basically, what you may do right now is highlight verbs, nouns, or adjectives, and to split words in syllables.

Just check any of the option — or multiple — and you will notice that Edge changes the text based on the enabled options. If you enable verbs, all words are color-coded in red to make them distinguishable from other content.

There is also an option to show labels. These highlight the type, e.g. v for verbs, to make it even clearer on first glance.

Closing Words

Grammar Tools are designed to highlight certain parts of speech to identify them. It may improve accessibility or help English learners, but it is probably not something that most Edge users may find super-useful.

Now You: what is your take on the Grammar Tools feature? (via Techdows)

Ghacks needs you. You can find out how to support us here (https://www.ghacks.net/support/) or support the site directly by becoming a Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/ghacks)). Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post First look at Grammar Tools in the new Microsoft Edge appeared first on gHacks Technology News.

Google's blocking new Microsoft Edge from accessing new design

Another accidental oops by Google that affects a competing web browser in a negative way; this time, users of the new Microsoft Edge browser are affected and the Google site that kicks Microsoft’s browser this time is YouTube.

Microsoft Edge users may still access YouTube but they only get the old design at the time. Some may not mind, as the old design offers better performance than the new. Others may object to the blocking of the new layout on YouTube as it works perfectly fine in Microsoft’s browser.

If you check out https://www.youtube.com/new/ in Microsoft Edge, you get a “your browser is not supported” message. That message is followed by the obligatory “get Google Chrome” instead message. Since there is no explanation as to why Edge is not supported while the classic Edge and other browsers are supported, some may switch to Google Chrome if the browser is not installed already.

google youtube not supported

Microsoft Edge users will notice that live chat is not working as well in the client at the time. YouTube displays a notification that the browser needs to be updated because it appears to be an older version.

There is no newer version, however.

live chat nono edge

The new Microsoft Edge browser is not available as a stable version at the time of writing and things may not work correctly in preview versions.

If a web browser supports features required to display a website on the other hand, that website should not go out of its way to block it from content or features.

If you change the user agent in the new Microsoft Edge, you will notice that you get access to the new YouTube design all of a sudden.

browser works

Live chat still does not work when you change the user agent though.

Closing Words

Microsoft has been anti-competitive in the past and some hold this against the company even today. My stance is that any form of anti-competitive behavior, especially from a position of power — regardless if done on purpose, neglect, or accident — is something that companies should be reprimanded for.

YouTube blocking Edge from functionality is not the first Google property that put a spoke in the new Microsoft Edge’s wheel. Google Docs displayed an “unsupported browser” message to Edge users as well on any document page on the site.

Firefox was on the receiving end for a very long time and a former Mozilla executive accused Google recently of using a sustained pattern of “oops” and “delay” that hurt the browser immensely.

One interesting takeaway from this is that Google is still in a position to hurt competing browsers (be it actively or accidentally) even if these browsers use the same engine as Google Chrome.

Now You: What is your take on this development? Anything that can be done about it? (via Deskmodder)

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Latest Windows 10 updates break access to some UK Government websites

If you have installed the latest round of cumulative updates for Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system, you may have noticed that some official government sites in the UK are no longer accessible in Internet Explorer or Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft released security updates for all supported versions of Windows 10 on Tuesday on the company’s monthly Patch Day. On Thursday, Microsoft added a known issue to the update KB4494441  for Windows 10 version 1809 revealing that it may install twice on some user devices.

edge ie issue windows gov.uk

Today, another issue was added to the list of known issues; this time, for all updates for Windows 10 released on the May 2019 Patch Day.

After installing the May 14, 2019 update, some gov.uk websites that don’t support HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) may not be accessible through Internet Explorer 11 or Microsoft Edge.

The issue affects connectivity to some UK government websites (those ending in gov.uk). Microsoft notes that the issue affects sites that don’t support HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security), and that the issue affects Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge only.

One of the changes in the released updates added gov.uk to the HTTP Strict Transport Security Top Level Domains (HSTS TLD) for Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge.

While that improves security when connecting to these sites, it breaks gov.uk sites that don’t support HSTS.

Microsoft notes that it is working on a resolution for the issue and plans to release an update quickly to resolve the issue in all supported versions of the operating system.

Windows 10 users who run into the problem may want to use a different web browser to access these government sites in the meantime as the issue affects Internet Explorer 11 and Microsoft Edge only. If that is not possible and access to these sites is essential, it is only possible to uninstall the cumulative update to resolve the issue.

Affected versions of Windows 10 and Windows Server:

Closing Words

The number of broken UK government sites is unknown but it is important enough for Microsoft to add it to the list of known issues. The latest issue highlights again that Microsoft’s approach to testing and verifying updates needs to be improved.

Did Microsoft generate a list of uk.gov websites and test connectivity to those in IE and Edge?

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