Reclaim privacy on Windows 10 with new Debotnet tool

Debotnet is a new application for devices running Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system designed to make configuration changes to improve privacy. The application is developed by Mirinsoft, which you may known from programs such as CloneApp, the disk cleanup alternative Cleanmgr+, or the program download helper Roboget.

Debotnet is available as a beta release currently; interested users can download the latest binary or the source of the application from the project’s GitHub page. Just extract the archive the binary is provided in and run the software afterwards. Note that Windows may throw a SmartScreen warning because it is a new program and relatively unknown.

Debotnet

The interface looks similar to that of other privacy tools for the operating system (You can check out our master list of privacy programs for Windows 10 here).

debotnet windows 10 privacy

The application interface is divided into three columns. The second column lists the tweaks and modifications, the third provides a description for the currently selected tweak. The description may list PowerShell commands that may be run manually to apply the change to the system; good, as it improves transparency and provides tech-savvy users with options to verify the method.

One interesting feature of Debotnet is the ability to edit the description. While it may only be useful to some users, it can in theory be used to modify commands that the program executes or add to the description to provide additional information.

Note: The beta version of the application does not create backups, e.g. system restore points, at the time of writing.  It is recommended that you create a backup of the system partition or the entire system before you run it as you have no option to restore changed functionality at the time otherwise.

Basically, what you do is go through the list of available privacy modifications to enable those that you want to apply to the underlying system. Once you are done, you hit the “run” button and confirm that you want to apply the selected modifications to make the changes to the system.

You may also enable debug mode to make a dry run. Using it, you will be presented with information about Registry changes and other changes that the program would make it you’d hit the run button.

The program supports roughly 70 modifications at the time; some remove preinstalled applications, others disable certain features such as automatic updates, Cortana or Windows tips.

Most program settings are modified using a text editor; this is not overly comfortable and may pose some issues for inexperienced users but experienced users may modify theme related options there for the most part.

Closing Words

Debloatnet is a promising program for Windows 10 to tame the operating system’s hunger for data. It is a beta program and as such in an early state of development. I’d like to see an automated backup option and tweak categories to improve manageability.

Now You: Do you use privacy tools? If so which and why? (via Deskmodder)

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How to block the automatic installation of suggested Windows 10 apps

When you sign-in to a new Windows 10 profile or device for the first time, chance is that you notice several third-party applications and games listed prominently in the Start Menu.

Candy Crush Saga is probably the most famous example of such an offer but there are other games and applications such as Netflix, Twitter, the Windows 10 edition of Minecraft or Farmville 2 that may be displayed in the Start Menu.

windows 10 suggested apps

It is easy enough to remove these, just right-click on the icon and select uninstall to remove it, but that does not take care of future suggestions that may be put on the device automatically.

Tip: you may use third-party applications to uninstall Windows 10 apps. Free options include Revo Uninstaller Free, Geek Uninstaller, or AppBuster.

If you want to avoid these altogether, you need to make a change to the Windows Registry. Here is how that is done:

  1. Open the Windows Registry Editor, e.g. by using the shortcut Windows-R to open the runbox, typing regedit.exe and hitting the Enter-key-
  2. Confirm the UAC prompt that is displayed.
  3. Paste the following key into the path field at the top or navigate to the key manually: HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionContentDeliveryManager
  4. Check if the Dword value SilentInstalledAppsEnabled exists.
    1. If it does exist, double-click on it and set its data value to 0. A value of 0 turns the suggested apps feature off on the Windows 10 system. You may turn it on again at any point in time by setting the data value to 1.
    2. If the Dword value does not exist, right-click on ContentDeliveryManager and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value. Name it SilentInstalledAppsEnabled and give it the value 0.
  5. Restart the PC after closing the Registry Editor.

Please note that the setting prevents future suggested apps from being installed; it does not affect applications that are already installed on the device. You still need to remove these manually from the device to get rid of them.

You may also download a Registry file that you just need to run on the Windows 10 device to turn the suggested applications feature on or off. Just click on the following link (disable_suggested_apps) to download it to your system (thanks Majorgeeks). Just extract the archive and run the “disable” or “enable” Registry file to turn the feature off or on.

 

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Microsoft reorganizes teams to speed up Windows 10 development

Microsoft adjusted the development cycle of the company’s Windows 10 operating system to the development cycle of Microsoft Azure; the change explains the longer development period of Windows 10 2004, the next feature update version of the operating system.

Azure updates are released in the second and fourth quarter of each year, and the decision was made to adapt Windows updates, which were historically released in the first and third quarter, to the development cycle.

The company made other changes in recent time. It dropped the Skip Ahead ring entirely and made the Fast Ring the cutting edge development channel. Features get introduced into the Fast Ring earlier than before now and they are no longer linked to a particular version of the Windows 10 operating system. One interesting effect of the change is that it is now possible to push features into release versions of Windows 10 after they have been tested in the Insider Rings.

Microsoft appears to have separated development teams as well in order for changes to be pushed more quickly to Windows 10 devices. A recent observation by Twitter user Walking Cat suggests that Microsoft may have split the development team into a CoreOS team and a Shell Experience team.

windows 10 feature experience pack

The CoreOS team follows the Azure development cycle while the Shell Experience team may push out changes to Windows independently of feature update releases. The change makes a lot of sense considering that it gives Microsoft more flexibility when it comes to the introduction of new features. Instead of having to wait for the next feature update release, Microsoft could push out new features at any time it wants to any version of Windows 10 it wants under the new structure.

Another indicator for that is the release of the new Windows Feature Experience Pack. The version is now highlighted in the latest Insider builds under About in the Settings. While the app does nothing obvious at this point, it may be used in the future by Microsoft to push new features and updates to the system independently of regular updates.

Closing words

Microsoft used the year to reorganize Windows 10 development. It is now in a position to test and release features and feature updates independently of releases of new feature update versions of Windows 10. (via Deskmodder)

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Windows 7: Microsoft Security Essentials will receive definition updates after support end

Microsoft Security Essentials will receive security definition updates after Windows 7 support ends despite Microsoft’s earlier claims stating the contrary.

Earlier this week, Microsoft stated in no uncertain terms that the company’s security software Microsoft Security Essentials would not receive any more updates after Windows 7’s support end on January 14, 2020.

Microsoft answered the question whether Microsoft Security Essentials could be used to protect computers after end of support:

No, your Windows 7 computer is not protected by MSE after January 14, 2020. MSE is unique to Windows 7 and follows the same lifecycle dates for support.

Woody Leonhard questioned whether Microsoft would indeed retire the application in its entirety even for customers who paid Microsoft for Extended Security Updates. Businesses and Enterprise customers may extend support that Windows 7 receives by up to three years by paying Microsoft per device or user (a bypass for non-businesses systems was found recently).

microsoft security essentials

Would Microsoft really disable Microsoft Security Essentials on these devices despite the fact that these companies and organizations pay Microsoft for extended support? Turns out, no, that is not what Microsoft wants to do.

The company modified the answer on the FAQ page so that it now reads:

Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) will continue to receive signature updates after January 14, 2020. However, the MSE platform will no longer be updated.

The most likely explanation that I have for this is that Microsoft meant software updates all long when it mentioned that MSE would not be supported anymore and that it had no intention of disabling the release of new security definitions.

I think that Microsoft will continue to push definition updates to all Windows 7 devices that run Microsoft Security Essentials. It is the sane thing to do considering that a huge number of Home systems and unsupported systems in organizations still run the operating system.

If you look back at how Microsoft handled definition updates when it retired Windows XP and Windows Vista, you will notice that support was extended and not cut off at the time the operating systems ran out of support.

As far as Microsoft Security Essentials software updates are concerned, those won’t be released anymore. It is possible, however, that Microsoft will push out updates if a serious security issue is detected in the application.

It would not be the first time that Microsoft would release a security update for an unsupported operating system. The company released an update for Windows XP back in 2017, two years after end of support, that protected systems against WannaCry attacks.

 

 

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SimpleVideoCutter is a free and incredibly easy to use video trimming tool for Windows

Most video editing tools have a lot of options that the average user won’t use. If you’re looking for a way to just cut unwanted sections from videos, the open source application SimpleVideoCutter is an interesting choice.

Just download the latest version from the project’s GitHub website and extract the archive to a directory of your choice.

SimpleVideoCutter is a free and incredibly easy to use video trimming tool for Windows

The program’s GUI consists of a menubar at the top, a side-panel to the left with editing tools, and a video preview pane. The small panel at the bottom of the video pane is the timeline graph that you can use to view frames. A status bar is visible on the bottom of the window that displays the volume level and file selection status.

SimpleVideoCutter requires FFmpeg (also open source) to be installed, for converting video files. I used the Windows 64-bit Static version. Once you have downloaded it, select the path to the FFmpeg.exe in the settings video of the video editor program.

Open a file that you want to edit to start the cutting process. SimpleVideoCutter supports the following video formats: MOV, AVI, MP4, WMV, RM and MPG. The video should begin playing in the video pane, and you can pause it anytime you want to by hitting space or using the mouse. The vertical line on the timeline bar indicates the current position of the playback. Mouse over the timeline to get a preview of the frame to pop-up, you can use this to decide the start and end positions.

SimpleVideoCutter video preview

Select a start position in the video using the “Set Start” option from the side-bar. For e.g. let’s say you want to edit a video you took on a vacation or at a party, and you find that the first 5 seconds of the video are shaky or that something is blocking the view-finder; place the cursor at a frame after 5 seconds (use the timeline).

This is your starting point, similarly pick an end point. You’ll notice the timeline highlights the portion of the video that is selected. You can preview the selected duration using the “Play range” option. Use the clear selection button if you’re not happy with your choice and start over. There are absolutely no output settings to tinker with at all, so the program does live up to its name.

Use the enqueue option and SimpleVideo Cutter will begin the trimming process. You can view the progress in the tasks panel. The process was quite memory intensive, but that also depends on the quality of the video you are working with. The video resolution, frame rate and audio sample rate were preserved accurately. So, it was pretty much a lossless editing/conversion process and it took just a couple of clicks.

SimpleVideoCutter output

Note: If your edited videos end up blurry, it may be because of issues with FFMpeg. I forced the EXE to close, and it resulted in blurry videos. To fix it, I had to re-select FFMpeg’s path in the program.

Closing Words

SimpleVideoCutter is a portable program. It’s user-friendliness is truly the best feature of the application. I think it can be a good solution for editing videos that you shoot on your phone, and since it retains the quality, you can share the videos online too.

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Microsoft makes changes to the Fast Ring and hints at new servicing releases

Microsoft revealed in November 2019 that it would end the Skip Ahead Windows Insiders Ring. Skip Ahead was designed to provide testers with a glimpse of future versions of Windows 10 that would not be released anytime soon.

With Skip Ahead removed as an option, Windows Insiders can choose between Fast, Slow, and Release Preview rings. The termination of the Skip Ahead ring raised questions that Microsoft did not answer at the time. Would Microsoft continue to test features designed for future versions of Windows 10 — opposed to the next release — and if so, how? Would all Insiders be able to test these features or only part of the population?

windows insider program fast ring

Microsoft released a new Windows 10 build yesterday and with the announcement came the long awaited answers to those questions.

Fast Ring Insider systems will receive the “latest code changes” from the active development branch going forward according to Microsoft. Means: new features will show up on Fast Ring systems first after they are updated to new builds.

Microsoft notes that these new features are no longer matched to a particular release. They may be released as part of full feature updates or as servicing releases. Feature updates don’t necessarily mean the next feature update that is in the works for Windows 10. Microsoft states explicitly that the new code that it integrates into Fast Ring builds will be introduced when it is ready (or not at all as there is also the likelihood of it being pulled completely before stable release).

New features and OS improvements done in this branch during these development cycles will show up in future Windows 10 releases when they are ready. And we may deliver these new features and OS improvements as full OS build updates or servicing releases.

Servicing releases refers to updates that are similar in nature to Windows 10 version 1909 which Microsoft released this year.

While Microsoft stated in November 2019 that it had no plans to make future Windows 10 updates like Windows 10 version 1909, it appears that the company may indeed plan to release other updates, maybe Windows 10 version 21H2, in a similar fashion.

Closing Words

Microsoft reorganized the Insider system and channels, to take into account servicing updates among other things. Most Windows 10 users and admins I talked to were in favor of a smaller update like Windows 10 version 1909 and a larger more feature-rich update earlier in the year.

 

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Did Microsoft release another Windows 10 update by mistake?

Back in October 2019, Microsoft released an update intended for Autopilot-powered devices to its entire userbase; the company pulled the update soon thereafter. It appears that Microsoft made a similar mistake in December 2019 when it pushed yet another update designed for Autopilot-powered devices to other devices.

“Windows Autopilot is a zero-touch, self-service Windows deployment platform introduced with Windows 10, version 1703” according to Microsoft. It enables system administrators to configure and set-up new devices to prepare them for use in production environments.  The main idea behind Windows Autopilot is to make things easier for administrators and end-users alike, and it may also reduce deployment, maintenance, and management costs.

windows 10 update mistake

Microsoft acknowledged that the Windows Autopilot update KB4532441 was made available to non-Autopilot-powered devices. An addendum to the Knowledgebase support articles provides further information and the acknowledgement of the issue:

This update was available through Windows Update. However, we have removed it because it was being offered incorrectly. When an organization registers or configures a device for Windows Autopilot deployment, the device setup automatically updates Windows Autopilot to the latest version.

Our colleagues over at Windows Latest spotted the mistake and wrote about it on December 12, 2019. According to the information, administrators who ran a check for updates using the built-in Windows Update functionality of the Windows 10 devices would see the update returned (up to the point at which Microsoft removed the update).

The update would install but it would be offered again on the next check for updates. Microsoft claims that the update has no effect on  devices not powered by Windows-Autopilot and that it should not have been offered to Windows 10 Home devices.

Note There is no effect on Windows Autopilot being offered to Windows 10 devices. If you were offered this update and do not use Autopilot, installing this update will not affect you. Windows Autopilot update should not be offered to Windows 10 Home.

Administrators who notice that the update is installed on their devices that are not powered by Windows Autopilot may uninstall the Windows Update like any other update.

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How to disable the "Your Windows 7 PC is out of support" full screen popup

Microsoft plans to inform users of the company’s Windows 7 operating system on January 15, 2020 that support for the system ended. The company wants to display a full screen popup on Windows 7 PCs from January 15, 2020 onward.

Note: Support for Microsoft Security Essentials ends on January 14, 2020 as well.

Microsoft integrated a new version of the End of Service notifier executable in the December  2019 Monthly Rollup for Windows 7.  EOSnotify.exe, which is located under ,%windir%system32,  is used to display the full screen popup on Windows 7 devices when support ends.

The executable file is run via the scheduled tasks EOSNotify and EOSNotify2 which administrators find under Microsoft > Winodws > Setup in the operating system’s Task Scheduler. The first task launches the full screen message when a user logs into the operating system, the second daily at 12 PM.

your windows 7 pc is out of support

It displays the following message:

Your Windows 7 PC is out of support.

As of January 14, 2020, support for Windows 7 has come to an end. Your PC is more vulnerable to viruses and malware due to:

  • No security updates
  • No software updates
  • No tech support

Microsoft strongly recommends using Windows 10 on a new PC for the latest security features and protection against malicious software.

Microsoft’s suggestion is puzzling as it recommends getting a new PC and running Windows 10 on that PC. No word about the current PC and upgrading that PC to Windows 10.

The popup has three links that users may activate:

  • Learn More
  • Remind me Later
  • Don’t remind me again

Users may select “don’t remind me again” to block future popups on the system. It is furthermore possible to modify the Windows Registry to disable the message as well.

Disable the Windows 7 end of support popup

  1. Use Windows-R to open the Run box. Type regedit to start the Registry Editor.
  2. If an UAC prompt is displayed, confirm it.
  3. Navigate to the following path: HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionEOSNotify
  4. If the Dword value DiscontinueEOS is listed under EOSNotify, double-click it and set its value to 1.
  5. If it is not yet, create the value (right-click on EOSNotify, select New >Dword  (32-bit) Value).

Selecting “don’t remind me again” will set the DiscontinueEOS value to 1.

Closing Words

It is likely that many users will continue to run Windows 7 even after support end. Some may upgrade to Windows 10 (which is still free if a genuine key is available), others may switch to Linux.

Microsoft will support Enterprises and small businesses who sign up for Extended Security Updates until January 2023 with security updates. A method was discovered recently to install these patches on Home devices running Windows 7 but it is too early to tell whether it will remain an option after support ends officially. Third-party 0Patch plans to release some patches for Windows 7 for free as well.

Now You: do you run Windows 7 devices? What will you do after January 14, 2020? (via Bleeping Computer)

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Windows 7: Microsoft Security Essentials support ends on January 14, 2020

Windows 7 Home users who protect their systems with the security software Microsoft Security Essentials will soon have to find a different product to protect their devices as Microsoft won’t support the software anymore after support for the operating system ends.

Microsoft ends support for Windows 7 on January 14, 2020, the January 2020 Patch Day. The company won’t release updates anymore after that date for Home users. Organizations have options to extend support by up to three years by paying Microsoft per device (small businesses) or per user (Enterprises).

microsoft security essentials

The company published a Extended Security Updates (ESU) FAQ on its support website that is aimed at organizations for the most part. Our colleagues over at Deskmodder dug deep into the FAQ and found out that Microsoft won’t provide Microsoft Security Essentials updates anymore after support for Windows 7 is terminated.

Will Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) continue to protect my computer after the end of support?

No, your Windows 7 computer is not protected by MSE after January 14, 2020. MSE is unique to Windows 7 and follows the same lifecycle dates for support.

Windows XP users may remember that Microsoft extended security updates support when support ended for that operating system in 2014; the FAQ entry confirms that Microsoft won’t give Windows 7 customers the same courtesy.

Organizations may continue to use System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) as it is covered by ESU and will even be updated regardless of ESU status. In other words: If SCEP is used, the system continues to be protected by it as definition and engine updates are provided. AV updates will be supplied until January 2023 for the SCEP Current Branch.

Closing Words

Windows 7 users who still use Microsoft Security Essentials on devices that run Windows 7 need to switch to a different antivirus solution after January 14, 2020 if they plan to keep running the operating system after end of support.

Most third-party antivirus solutions will continue to work, at least for a while. Windows 7’s userbase is still large and many software companies will continue to support the operating system after support ends officially.

Many Windows 7 customers may upgrade their devices to Windows 10 for free (or switch to Linux, which is also free).

Now You: Do you plan to run Windows 7 after January 2020?

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Microsoft Windows Security Updates December 2019 overview

Welcome to the overview of the last Patch Tuesday of 2019. Microsoft released security and non-security updates for all supported products on December 11, 2019.

Our monthly series provides system administrators and interested users with information about the updates that Microsoft released in the month that is covered. It includes statistics, links to security and non-security updates, as well as download links, and links to resources and other official pages.

Click here to access the November 2019 Microsoft Patch Day overview.

Microsoft Windows Security Updates December 2019

microsoft windows security updates december 2019

You may download the following (zipped) Excel spreadsheet that contains a list of released updates in December 2019: microsoft-windows-security-updates-december-2019

Executive Summary

  • This is the last Patch Tuesday of 2019.
  • Microsoft released security updates for all versions of Windows as well as other company products such as Microsoft Office, SQL Server, Visual Studio, and Skype for Business.
  • Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909 share the same security KBs.
  • Microsoft’s Windows 7 operating system won’t receive updates anymore after the January 2020 Patch Day (Small Businesses and Enterprises may buy extensions) Microsoft plans to display a full-screen notification on January 15, 2020 on Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional (without ESU) and Ultimate editions of Windows 7.

Operating System Distribution

  • Windows 7: 14 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 13 rated important
    • CVE-2019-1468 | Win32k Graphics Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
  • Windows 8.1: 11 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 10 rated important
    • CVE-2019-1468 | Win32k Graphics Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
  • Windows 10 version 1803: 14 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 12 important
    • CVE-2019-1468 | Win32k Graphics Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
    • CVE-2019-1471 | Windows Hyper-V Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
  • Windows 10 version 1809: 15 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 13  important
    • Same as Windows 10 version 1803
  • Windows 10 version 1903: 14 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 12 important
  • Windows 10 version 1909: same as Windows 10 version 1903

Windows Server products

  • Windows Server 2008 R2: 12 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 11 important.
    • CVE-2019-1468 | Win32k Graphics Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
  • Windows Server 2012 R2: 11 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 10 important.
    • Same as Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2016: 13 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 12 important.
    • Same as Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2019: 15 vulnerabilities: 22 critical and 13 are important
    • CVE-2019-1468 | Win32k Graphics Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
    • CVE-2019-1471 | Windows Hyper-V Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Other Microsoft Products

  • Internet Explorer 11: 1 vulnerability: 1 important
  • Microsoft Edge: none?
  • Microsoft Edge on Chromium: none?

Windows Security Updates

Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2

  • Monthly Rollup: KB4530734
  • Security-only Update: KB4530692 — The security-only update is only available through the Microsoft Update Catalog website and WSUS.

Changes:

  • Security updates to Windows Input and Composition, Windows Virtualization, Windows Kernel, Windows Peripherals, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server.

Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2

Changes:

Security updates to Windows Virtualization, Windows Kernel, Windows Peripherals, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server.

Windows 10 version 1803

Changes:

  • Fixes an issue that prevented Microsoft Store from opening on Windows on Arm.
  • Security updates to Windows Virtualization, Windows Kernel, Windows Peripherals, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server

Windows 10 version 1809

Changes:

  • Fixed a diagnostic data processing issue for devices on which the setting was set to Basic.
  • Same as Windows 10 version 1803.

Windows 10 version 1903

Changes:

  • Fixed an issue that could cause error 0x3B in cldflt.sys on some devices.
  • Fixed an issue that could prevent the creation of local user accounts when IME is used.
  • Security updates to Windows Virtualization, Windows Kernel, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server.

Windows 10 version 1909

Changes:

  • Same as Windows 10 version 1903

Other security updates

KB4530677 — 2019-12 Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer

KB4530691 — 2019-12 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

KB4530695 — 2019-12 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Server 2008

KB4530698 — 2019-12 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

KB4530719 — 2019-12 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Server 2008

KB4530681 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1507

KB4530689 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1607

KB4530711 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1703

KB4530714 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1709

KB4531787 — 2019-12 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2008

KB4532920 — 2019-12 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

Known Issues

Windows 7 SP1 and Server 2008 R2:

Microsoft does not list any known issues on the KB support article but the release notes state that there is an (unnamed) issue.

Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2:

  • Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail

Windows 10 version 1803:

  • Same as Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2.
  • Problem creating local user accounts during the Out of Box Experienced when using Input Method Editor (IME).

Windows 10 version 1809:

  • Same as Windows 10 version 1803
  • Devices with “some” Asian language packs may throw error 0x800f0982 – PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND.

Security advisories and updates

ADV990001 | Latest Servicing Stack Updates

ADV190026 | Microsoft Guidance for cleaning up orphaned keys generated on vulnerable TPMs and used for Windows Hello for Business

Non-security related updates

KB4532997 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 Windows 10 Version 1607, and Windows Server 2016

KB4532998 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1703

KB4532999 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1709

KB4533000 –2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1903,and Windows Server 2016

KB4533001 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019

KB4533002 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows Server, version 1909 and Windows 10 Version 1909

KB4533013 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.7.2 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019

KB4533094 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.7.2 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019

KB4533003 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

KB4533004 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2

KB4533005 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2

KB4533010 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

KB4533011 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows 8.1 , and Windows Server 2012 R2

KB4533012 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008

KB4533095 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2

KB4533096 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and Windows Server 2012

KB4533097 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2

KB4533098 — 2019-12 Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0, 4.5.2, 4.6 for Windows Server 2008

KB890830 — Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool – December 2019

Microsoft Office Updates

You find Office update information here.

How to download and install the December 2019 security updates

Security updates are downloaded and installed automatically on most (Home) Windows systems. Windows runs checks for updates regularly to download and install security updates released by Microsoft.

Windows administrators may run manual checks for updates to speed up the process or download patches from the Microsoft Update Catalog website.

Note: we recommend that backups are created before updates are installed.

Do this to run a manual check for updates:

  1. Open the Start Menu of the Windows operating system, type Windows Update and select the result.
  2. Select check for updates in the application that opens. Updates may be installed automatically when they are found or offered by Windows; this depends on the operating system and version that is used, and update settings.

Direct update downloads

Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP

  • KB4530734 — 2019-12 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7
  • KB4530692 — 2019-12 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 7

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2

  • KB4530702 — 2019-12 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1
  • KB4530730 — 2019-12 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 8.1

Windows 10 (version 1803)

  • KB4530717 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1809)

  • KB4530715  — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1903)

  • KB4530684 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903

Windows 10 (version 1909)

  • KB4530684 — 2019-12 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1909

Additional resources

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